Saturday, December 20, 2014

Diamonds Are Forever


I recently learned this crochet stitch and I love it! I had to incorporate it into a pattern somehow to share with you all. It's the diamond trellis stitch, and it leaves this wonderfully textured diamond lattice that looks so elegant. It's a pretty stiff stitch, so it would be great for baskets or even a mug cozy, but I think it would look great in gloves, beanies, and boot cuffs (potential patterns to come up with).

Like the cable stitch, it looks complicated, but it's only comprised of one "difficult" stitch (the front post triple crochet). What makes it somewhat challenging is figuring out where to put the stitches. I'm hoping that with pictures and detailed instructions, I can help beginner to advanced crocheters master this stitch. I am so in love with the texture and design of it!

So, my first ever diamond trellis pattern is an infinity scarf (the Forever part in the title). I think this is a good pattern to start off with because it's repetitive and a great way to learn the stitch. It will feel difficult at first, but once you get past the first couple rows, it will become mindless and you'll be finished in no time. There are pictures below to show how to do each step, and the full pattern without pictures is written below below.

I used worsted weight yarn (4) and a larger hook since the stitch is a little stiff. This makes the scarf hang a little better. Sport weight yarn (3) would also work great for this pattern. I haven't tried it, so I'm not entirely sure, but I don't think chunky yarn would work well for a scarf (great for a basket though!).

You may sell the finished product from this pattern, but please reference and link this post. Please don't claim this pattern as your own or sell the pattern. I'd love to see pictures of your finished product! You can put them up on Ravelry or post it on my Facebook Page.

Materials:
Size J crochet hook (6.00 mm)
Tapestry needle
Stitch markers (if needed)
2 skeins of Heartland Terroir: Yellowstone

Abbreviations:
ch = chain
dc = double crochet
fsc = foundation single crochet
fptr = front post triple*
fptr2tog = front post triple 2 together*
sc = single crochet
sl st = slip stitch
st = stitch
yo =  yarn over
* see Special Stitches for instructions

Special Stitches:
fptr = front post triple
Yo hook twice, insert hook from front to back around the indicated post, yo, pull up a loop. Yo, pull through two loops, yo, pull through two loops, yo, pull through last two loops.

fptr2tog = front post triple 2 together
Yo hook twice, insert hook from front to back around the indicated post, yo, pull up a loop. Yo, pull through two loops, yo, pull through two loops (two loops left on hook). Yo hook twice, insert hook from front to back around the next indicated stitch, yo, pull up a loop. Yo, pull through two loops, yo pull through two loops. Yo, pull through last three loops.

Two st have been combined by a fptr. This stitch is what creates the diamond shape.

Make 204 fsc, or ch 205 and sc in second ch from hook and across. If you would like your scarf longer or shorter, just make sure that your fsc is a multiple of 4.

Join with a sl st with the beginning to make a loop, making sure not to twist the loop.

Ch 2 (does not count as dc), dc in same st and in each of the following around. Join with a sl st to the beginning dc, not the ch 2.

I put stitch markers in every 4th stitch for instructional purposes, and I found it helpful to see where exactly the stitches will go. Since this is a fairly large project, I didn't put them in every single 4th stitch. Hopefully, once you repeat the pattern a few times, you will get the hang of it and see where the stitches go. The pattern is fptr or fptr2tog with 3 sc in between each one.

Ch 1 (does not count as sc), sc in same st and in the next 2 st. You have reached the first stitch marker. There are 3 stitches between each set of stitch markers, and you will be making the fptr around sc below the middle dc (labeled 2 in the picture above). It's 3rd st after the 3rd sc you made.
If you fold back the fptr you just made, you can see empty stitches that we skipped between the two stitch markers. Make 3 sc in each of those stitches. Now you're at the next stitch marker.

Now,  start the fptr2tog around the same sc post from the row below that you made the last fptr around. Find the middle dc between the next two stitch markers. Complete the fptr2tog in the sc below that dc. It's the 3rd st after the last sc you made.


Fold back the fptr2tog you just made, and make 3 sc between the two stitch markers. When you stop using the stitch markers, you skip a stitch after the last sc you made, and make 3 sc after that.
 Repeat this around, making fptr2tog around the last fptr you made and around the sc below the middle dc between the next set of stitch markers. Sc in the next 3 sts. Once you get to the end, join with a sl st in the first sc, not the ch 1.


You made it past the most difficult part of the pattern, good job! It gets easier from here on out, I promise. 

Ch 2 (does not count as dc), dc in same stitch and in each stitch around. You should have the same amount of dc as your initial fsc. Join with a sl st to the beginning dc, not the ch 2.


Ch 1 (does not count as sc), sc in same stitch and in the next 2 st. Start the fptr2tog around the last fptr and complete it around the next two fptr.


Fold back the fptr2tog you just made and skip a stitch after the last sc you made. Sc in the next 3 sts.


Start the next fptr2tog around the last fptr2tog (underneath both stitches in the "X"), and complete it around the 2 posts of the next fptr2tog.


Fold back the fptr2tog you just made and skip a stitch after the last sc you made. Sc in the next 3 sts.

Repeat this around, making fptr2tog and 3 sc between them. Once you get to the end, join with a sl st in the beginning sc, not the ch 1.
See how nicely the diamonds are coming out? Repeat the alternating rows of dc and fptr2tog until the scarf is the desired width. I have 8 rows of diamonds. Fasten off and weave in the end tail.

Not too bad, right? It seems difficult, but once you get the hang of the pattern, you'll realize how simple it really is.


My scarf measures 31 in long and 7 in wide. It's so stylish and perfect for winter.


Diamonds Are Forever Pattern:
Notes about pattern:
- The ch at the beginning of each around does not count as a stitch.
- When joining, sl st in the beginning stitch, not the ch. This helps create an invisible seam.

Make a fsc that is a multiple of 4 until the scarf is the desired length. I made 204 fsc. Alternatively, you can ch and sc across.

Join with a sl st to the beginning end to form a loop. Be careful not to twist the loop.  

Round 1:
Ch 2 and dc in same st as ch. Dc in next st and in each around. Sl st to join (204 dc)

Round 2:
Ch 1 and sc in same st as ch. Sc in next 2 st. Skip 2 dc and fptr in the sc below the next dc. *Skip 1 st after the last sc made. Sc in next 3 st. Fptr2tog around the same sc post below as the last fptr made and around the 3rd sc below from the start of the fptr2tog.* Repeat from * to * around.  Sl st to join.

Round 3:
Repeat Round 1.

Round 4:
Ch 1 and sc in same st as ch. Sc in next 2 st. Fptr2tog around the next fptr posts. *Skip 1 st after the last sc made. Sc in next 3 st. Fptr2tog around the last fptr2tog made and the next fptr post.* Repeat from * to * around. Sl st to join.

Round 5:
Repeat Round 1.

Round 6:
Ch 1 and sc in same st as ch. Sc in next 2 st. *Fptr2tog around the last fptr2tog posts made and the next fptr2tog posts. Skip 1 st after the last sc made. Sc in next 3 st.* Repeat from * to * around. Sl st to join.

Repeat Rounds 5 and 6 until the scarf is the desired width. Fasten off and weave in any tails.

 
I love the different textures you get when you wear it since the scarf has a different pattern on either side.

5 comments:

  1. This is such an adorable pattern! I can't wait to take it with me on the 5 hour car ride ahead of me! ;)

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    Replies
    1. Thank you! I hope your scarf turns out great, and I can't wait to see it! Happy Holidays! :)

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    2. If I may make a suggestion, perhaps with the new stitches that you introduce you could make video tutorials. I'm very much a visual learner so it would be so helpful for me.

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    3. There is one for this stitch over at the creator of it's blog, Make My Day Creative.

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  2. Really great detail. Love this cowl!

    ReplyDelete